Trojans - Page 4 category archyve:

Octopus Trojan

Octopus Trojan

Octopus Trojan might be related to a particular group of hackers known as DustSquad because the malware’s targeted victims are diplomatic organizations from Central Asia, which is the region where these cybercriminals have been active for some years now. Our researchers at Anti-spyware-101.com report that the threat might allow cybercriminals to take control over the victims’ computers. Based on what we learned while testing the malicious application it looks like it could steal various information, track user’s activity, download files, and so on. No doubt, such actions could cause a lot of trouble for the victim and the organization he works at. Of course, the faster it is eliminated, the less damage it can do, which is why it is essential to know how to remove Octopus Trojan. Probably the safest option would be to acquire a legitimate antimalware tool that could handle the malicious application. Also, the instructions available below will demonstrate how to erase it manually. Read more »

Godsomware v1.0 Ransomware

Godsomware v1.0 Ransomware

Godsomware v1.0 Ransomware is a malicious threat that blocks user’s screen and displays a ransom note asking to pay for the decryption of user’s files the malware claims to have encrypted. The good news is, even if the infection’s warning claims otherwise, your data may not be ruined. Our researchers at Anti-spyware-101.com report the malicious application does not encipher user’s files. It means the malware only pretends to be damaging user’s data to trick him into paying for its decryption. Luckily, we know how to unlock the screen without funding the cybercriminals who developed Godsomware v1.0 Ransomware, and if you want to know how to get rid of it too, you should check the steps available below this report. However, if you wish to find out more about the infection, we encourage you to read our full article too. Read more »

decrypt@fros.cc Ransomware

decrypt@fros.cc Ransomware

decrypt@fros.cc Ransomware could encipher your private files with a secure cryptosystem, so if you do come across it, you could lose your data. However, our researchers at Anti-spyware-101.com say users who have backup copies have nothing to worry about as they could easily replace encrypted files. Those who did not make such emergency preparations before coming across this malicious application may think about paying to the cybercriminals behind the threat, but we would recommend against it as there are no guarantees they will provide the promised decryptor. Users who do not want to risk their savings should eliminate the malware. The task might not be as complicated as you could image, but you can see it for yourself if you slide below the article where we added manual deletion instructions for decrypt@fros.cc Ransomware. On the other hand, if you prefer using automatic features, you could acquire a legitimate antimalware tool that would help you erase the malicious program too. Read more »

Nog4yH4n Project Ransomware

Nog4yH4n Project Ransomware

Windows users are alerted about Nog4yH4n Project Ransomware. At the time of research conducted by our expert Anti-Spyware-101.com analysts, the malicious infection was not spreading actively. That was, most likely, due to the fact that the infection did not work as intended. Since there is absolutely no way we could predict the emergence of new infections or the upgrade of ineffective ones, we cannot say that this ransomware is a non-threat. We have to think of all possibilities, and one of them is that the threat will be fixed up and unleashed to invade unguarded Windows operating systems. When this threat invades, it is meant to encrypt files and attach the “.locked” extension to their names. Unfortunately, once files are encrypted, it is not possible to decrypt them. The only chance the victims of file-encrypting malware have to restore their files is if they are backed up. Backup copies should be stored on virtual clouds or external storage drives to ensure that they are not affected by malware. Whether or not you need to delete Nog4yH4n Project Ransomware from your operating system already, this removal guide shows how to do it, as well as how to prevent ransomware from harming files in the future. Read more »

castor-troy-restore@protonmail.com Ransomware

castor-troy-restore@protonmail.com Ransomware

castor-troy-restore@protonmail.com Ransomware seems to be a dangerous threat that might cause a lot of trouble. According to our specialists at Anti-spyware-101.com, the malware can encrypt various data found on the computer as well as disable Windows recovery features, delete shadow copies, and so on. After completing the mentioned tasks, the infection should show a ransom note saying users should contact the malicious application’s developers via email; if they want their data decrypted. We have no doubt the message from the cybercriminals would ask to pay a ransom as the note also mentions payment in Bitcoins. Keep it in mind, paying it could be hazardous as you do not know if the hackers will hold on to their word. If they decide not to, you would be unable to get your money back. Therefore, we recommend not to risk your savings and erase castor-troy-restore@protonmail.com Ransomware with the instructions located below or a legitimate antimalware tool. Read more »

GandCrab 5 Ransomware

GandCrab 5 Ransomware

GandCrab 5 Ransomware does not damage the system, but it can ruin all your photos, pictures, videos, and other similar files you might keep on the computer. The threat does so by encrypting each file with a secure encryption algorithm. Sadly, the only way to reverse the process is to use a specific decryption tool and a unique decryption key generated by the malware. The only problem is these means are available only to the malicious program’s creators, and they want a huge payment in exchange. Naturally, we do not recommend risking your saving to restore your files even if they are valuable to you. If you would like to know more about the malware before you choose whether it should be erased or not, you should read our full article. However, if you already know you have no intention to pay the ransom and wish to eliminate GandCrab 5 Ransomware as fast as possible you could slide below the text and use the given instructions. Read more »

5H311 1NJ3C706 Ransomware

5H311 1NJ3C706 Ransomware

5H311 1NJ3C706 Ransomware is a malicious threat that encrypts files on the victim’s computer and then shows a note demanding to pay a ransom. Usually, we do not recommend paying the ransom because there is always a chance the user could be tricked, and the money he spends might go to waste, but in this case, it may not be necessary. Apparently, the malware has an integrated decryption tool, which deciphers all user’s data after entering this passcode: 666HackerThn. Of course, we cannot be sure the decryption password will not be changed, but if you come across this infection and you have no other options to get your data back, it is worth a try. Needless to say, later on, we would recommend removing 5H311 1NJ3C706 Ransomware from the computer as leaving it could be still dangerous. If you need help with its deletion, you should take a look at the instructions we will place below the article. Read more »

Giyotin Ransomware

Giyotin Ransomware is among the newest ransomware infections detected by specialists at anti-spyware-101.com. It seems that malware targets Turkish-speaking users primarily, but it does not mean that you cannot encounter it. You might find any harmful program installed on your computer if you are not very careful, click on random links and advertisements that are displayed to you, and download tons of all kinds of applications from torrent websites. Luckily, Giyotin Ransomware does not encrypt files on users’ computers even though it places a window with a message in Turkish over the users’ screens claiming that all important files have been encrypted immediately after the successful entrance. According to specialists, this might show that Giyotin Ransomware is still in the development phase or hackers expect that users will send them money immediately after discovering a message opened on their Desktops. Since that window can be closed easily, you will see for yourself that none of your files have been locked – simply tap Alt+F4 to close it. It does not mean that you do not need to do anything else if your files have not been encrypted – you must still remove the ransomware infection from your PC. There is nothing smart about keeping malware on the system, even if it is not extremely harmful, because it might download an update from its C&C server and turn your life into a nightmare. Read more »

IT.Books Ransomware

IT.Books Ransomware

IT.Books Ransomware encrypts almost all files found on the computer, which is why some of the software might crash once the system gets infected, and data like images might become impossible to open. The cybercriminals behind this threat may offer their decryption tools for a particular price, but it seems to us it would be safer to restore enciphered data from backup copies. It would not cost you anything either. However, before attaching any removable devices or connecting to cloud storage where backup copies could be kept, it would be advisable to erase the malicious application first to be on the safe side. If you choose to follow our advice we encourage you to use the removal instructions available at the end of this report. On the other hand, if the process appears to be too complicated for you to complete on your own, you could get a legitimate antimalware tool and let it eliminate IT.Books Ransomware for you. Read more »

Kraken Cryptor 1.5 Ransomware

Kraken Cryptor 1.5 Ransomware is a nasty computer threat whose entrance will not be fun at all. It is one of those harmful malicious applications that enter computers to obtain money from users, so if you ever encounter it, you could no longer access a bunch of files on your computer. The ransomware infection locks files with .3gp, .1cd, .dat, .dbx, .class, .docx, .doc, .drw, .dxg, .djvu, .groups, .jar, .java, .json, and other popular extensions, but, luckily, it skips all system files. In other words, your computer will continue working normally even though you could no longer open a bunch of your files. You will be offered to acquire a unique key that can unlock encrypted personal files, but you should definitely not send money to cyber criminals. We do not say so without reason. Sending money to crooks is not a smart move no matter what kind of computer threat you encounter because it is unclear whether you will really solve your problems by making a payment. Speaking about this particular situation, the Kraken Cryptor 1.5 Ransomware encounter, we are sure this infection will not be deleted from your system even if you transfer a ransom. On top of that, you cannot be 100% sure that you could really unlock your files. Read more »