Trojans - Page 8 category archyve:

Rodentia Ransomware

Rodentia Ransomware

Rodentia Ransomware is the kind of malware that can instantly ruin your day. If it finds a security crack through which it can slither into your operating system, it might be able to encrypt your personal files. At the time of research, our analysts working in the Anti-Spyware-101.com internal lab did not see the threat encrypting files, but it was found that it is a modified version of the well-known Jigsaw Ransomware, and so it is possible that it could encrypt files successfully. Maybe a bug exists, and maybe it will be fixed in no time. Maybe the infection will remain helpless. In any case, if this infection got into your operating system, it is a good idea to delete it as soon as possible. If you keep reading this guide, you will learn how to remove Rodentia Ransomware, and, hopefully, you will also learn how to secure your operating system and, most important, your personal files against threats that could try to attack in the future. Read more »

Adame Ransomware

When Adame Ransomware attacks the operating system, it starts encrypting files right away, and then once that is done, the “.id[unique code].[supportcrypt2019@cock.li].Adame” extension should be visible. This extension is added to the encrypted files’ names, and this serves no other purpose than to identify the corrupted files. This makes it easier to see which files were corrupted, and while that does not help with decryption, it certainly can help assess the situation overall. If you have backups stored externally or online, you can check them to see if the corrupted files have backup replacements. We hope that that is the case because, unfortunately, decrypting the files corrupted by this malware appears to be impossible. If you come across a tool that promises to decrypt files, make sure you are cautious because you do not want to let in new infections, do you? Handling and deleting Adame Ransomware might be difficult enough as it is. So, do you know how to remove this infection? Read more »

ExpBoot Ransomware

ExpBoot Ransomware

If you can find the “.ExpBoot” extension attached at the end of your files’ names, ExpBoot Ransomware must have found a way to invade your operating system. Anti-Spyware-101.com research team has tested this infection in an internal lab, but it was not possible to determine a singular pathway into a system. It is possible that the infection could use different distribution techniques (via spam email, RDP backdoors, malware downloaders, or unreliable websites), but it is also possible that one specific method would be used. At this moment, however, that is unclear. We also cannot promise that the infection will not encrypt files in the future, which is what it claims to be capable of doing now. In reality, this infection does not encrypt files, and, instead, simply adds an alien extension to the files’ names to make sure that you cannot open them. Unfortunately, this could trick some victims into thinking that encryption has happened. Right now, however, if you delete ExpBoot Ransomware and remove the added extension, your files will be “restored.” Read more »

REvil Ransomware

REvil Ransomware is a computer infection that will try to push you into spending your money on a decryption key. This decryption key is supposedly necessary to restore your encrypted files. Although that is the common path of action when it comes to ransomware infections, computer security experts always maintain that paying for the decryption key is not the best choice. Users should remove REvil Ransomware instead without giving these criminals what they want. Scroll down to the bottom of this entry for the manual removal instructions. If necessary, get yourself a legitimate security tool to perform a full system scan. Read more »

Zero-Fucks Ransomware

Zero-Fucks Ransomware

Zero-Fucks Ransomware is a relatively new infection that was recently analyzed by our malware research team at Anti-Spyware-101.com. In fact, it is so new that it does not even work properly yet. The bad news is that it is already capable of encrypting files, and it could even spread successfully. The only thing that is missing is a functional ransom payment system. At the moment, when the threat delivers the ransom note, there is not enough information regarding the payment, and the displayed buttons – which, we assume, are correlated to the payment – do not work. These issues could have been resolved by the time you are reading this, and our team will issue an update if anything new is discovered. For now, however, we are dealing with a file-encryptor that does not function the right way. Of course, if it has invaded your operating system, you need to delete it regardless of the situation. Should you pay the ransom before removing Zero-Fucks Ransomware if that is possible? Continue reading to find out. Read more »

Extenbro Dns

Extenbro Dns is a dangerous infection that can seriously jeopardize your system’s security. It is a Trojan infection, and thus, it can remain hidden in your system for a long time before you notice that something is off. Computer security experts recommend that users run regular system scans to detect such infections as soon as possible. If you want to remove Extenbro Dns from your system, you should acquire a powerful security application that will help you terminate the Trojan for good. It is also possible that there are more dangerous programs on-board, so you need to take care of those, too. Read more »

COPAN Ransomware

COPAN Ransomware might look like an entirely new computer infection, but the truth is that it is merely a newer version of the notorious Dharma Ransomware program. It is also a rather slippery infection because it doesn’t leave much for us to deal with: It is known to delete itself once the encryption is complete. Nevertheless, there are still things you can to do remove COPAN Ransomware and everything related to it from your system. Also, it would be a good idea to learn more about ransomware and its distribution methods because you can never know when a similar intruder tumbles down into your PC again. Read more »

ChineseRarypt Ransomware

ChineseRarypt Ransomware

ChineseRarypt Ransomware is a malicious application that places files in an archive and encrypts it. Later on, the malware ought to drop a ransom note claiming only the threat’s creators can restore affected files and that victims who encounter it would have to pay for it. As always, we advise considering this demand carefully as you cannot know if the hackers will help you restore your files even if they promise to. In short, your money might be lost in vain, and if you do not wish to risk it, we encourage you to ignore the malware’s ransom note and restore data from backup copies that you could keep on cloud storage or elsewhere. Of course, it might be unsafe to do anything with an infected computer while the malicious application is still on it. To erase it, you should follow the instructions provided below or get a legitimate antimalware tool that would remove ChineseRarypt Ransomware for you. Read more »

Dqb Ransomware

Dqb Ransomware encrypts and marks user’s files with the .dqb extension. Afterward, the malicious application should display a ransom note explaining how to restore affected data. In truth, the note only tells how to contact the malware’s developers. However, based on our experience with such threats, we are almost one hundred percent sure that the reply letter from hackers should provide further instructions. Usually, they ask to pay a ransom and promise to deliver decryption tools in return. Cybercriminals often claim they can guarantee victims will receive what is promised, but you should know that in reality, such promises have no value. Victims might be asked to pay with Bitcoins, and once they do, they cannot take their money back. Therefore, the malware’s developers might get their payment whether they provide decryption tools or not. If you rather not risk losing your money for nothing, you could pay no attention to the ransom note and erase Dqb Ransomware. Read more »

WSH RAT

WSH RAT is a clandestine remote access tool that, in the hands of malicious cyber criminals, can become a seriously dangerous weapon. The infection appears to have been unleashed at the beginning of June, and it is currently actively sold on underground forums, where schemers, hackers, and virtual attackers reign. At the time of research, Anti-Spyware-101.com analysts found the threat to be sold for a mere $50 per month. That is not a lot of money under any circumstances, and, undoubtedly, attackers are exploiting the opportunity to use a seemingly well-established RAT. Unfortunately, the scale of this malware is yet to be determined, but, without a doubt, everyone needs to take appropriate security measures to ensure that operating systems are guarded against it. Detecting this malware once it is in might be very difficult, and some victims might discover it by chance. In any case, deleting this malware is crucial, and you will find useful WSH RAT removal tips in this report. Read more »